My Photo Ark Project: Inspiring people to care about endangered species

Register at https://wis.ntu.edu.sg/pls/webexe/REGISTER_NTU.REGISTER?EVENT_ID=OA17111010074010

Event Date
26 Jan 2018 (Fri), 05:30 PM – 07:00 PM
Venue
LT19A (Location Map)
Organiser
WKWSCI (Email : wkw-comms@ntu.edu.sg )

Event Info
Format:
My Photo Ark Project: Inspiring people to care about endangered species
Storytelling through Photography by Joel Sartore
60 mins presentation + Q&A

Talk summary:
“All species are vitally important to our very survival; we need bees and even flies to pollinate the fruits and vegetables we eat. We need intact rainforest to regulate the amount of rainfall we get in areas where we grow crops. But beyond what’s in it for us, I believe that each species has a basic right to exist.”
– Joel Sartore, National Geographic Fellow
During this presentation on how to effectively tell stories through photography, the award-winning National Geographic fellow, Joel Sartore will share why he started his Photo Ark project and how he managed to capture more than 6,500 portraits of animal species from around the world! It took him 15 years to reach this amazing achievement and it will take another 15 years to complete this ambitious project to portrait the world’s entire animal species.
Now you can take part of his journey. Join him at this talk to find out more.

About Joel Sartore:
Joel Sartore is a Photographer, Speaker, Author, Teacher, Conservationist, National Geographic Fellow, and a regular Contributor to National Geographic magazine. His hallmarks are a sense of humor and a Midwestern work ethic.
Joel Sartore started the Photo Ark in his hometown of Lincoln, Nebraska. Since then, Sartore, a world-renowned photographer has visited 40 countries in his quest to create this photo archive of global biodiversity. To date, Joel has completed portraits of more than 6,000 species, most photographed on either a plain black or white background. No matter its size, each animal is treated with the same amount of affection and respect. The results are portraits that are not just stunningly beautiful, but also intimate and moving. “It’s the eye contact that moves people,” Sartore says of the animals’ expressions. “It engages … feelings of compassion and a desire to help.”
Sartore has written several books, including RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species, Photographing Your Family, and Nebraska: Under a Big Red Sky. His most recent book is Let’s Be Reasonable. In addition to the work he has done for National Geographic, Sartore has contributed to Audubon magazine, Time, Life,Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, and numerous book projects.